Are you living in Australia’s unhealthiest postcodes?

Byron Bay is Australia’s booziest location for risky drinking, a town in Tassie tops the list for the most smokers, and WA’s Pinjarra poses the most danger to your waistline, the latest figures in a national health report card reveal.

The Australia’s Health Trackers map, released by the Australian Health Policy Collaboration reveals that your postcode can affect your portliness, propensity for a drink, potential for health problems, and even your blood pressure.

The interactive map allows you to tap in your postcode for a snapshot of the health of where you live.

Broadly, it reveals health snapshots such as snippets that Australia’s wealthiest postcodes are the healthiest postcodes. Drill down into the figures and you find your area’s rates of high blood pressure, risk of chronic diseases and data on smoking, alcohol intake and obesity.

It was developed by the Australian Health Policy Collaboration at Victoria University (VU) with the Public Health Information and Development Unit at Torrens University.

Australian Health Policy Collaboration director Rosemary Calder said the aim of tracking localised data was to use it to reduce the alarming rates of chronic diseases.

Byron Bay has the biggest percentage of risky drinkers in Australia, Pinjarra is worst for weight, and the Hobart suburbs of Gagebrook and Bridgewater have the worst smoking rates. Picture:Source:Supplied
Byron Bay has the biggest percentage of risky drinkers in Australia, Pinjarra is worst for weight, and the Hobart suburbs of Gagebrook and Bridgewater have the worst smoking rates. Picture:Source:Supplied

“One in every two Australians has a chronic disease, however roughly one third of these diseases are preventable,” said Ms Calder.

“Australia’s Health Tracker by Area is a call to action and a resource to help protect the most important asset in the country, our health.”

The data reveals the inland town of Pinjarra in WA, about 85km south of Perth, holds the title for the biggest weight problem in Australia, with 76.2 per cent of its adult population (over 18, age standardised rate per 100 population) falling into the obese or overweight category.

At the other end of the scale — but still a sobering illustration of the vast problem of obesity facing Australia, Melbourne’s inner city emerged as the place with the most people of a healthy weight (with a Body Mass Index of less than 25). The figures reveal 42.8 per cent of its population is overweight or obese.

Read the full article and a snapshot of results here.

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