Alcohol linked to seven types of cancer

Posted on July 28, 2016 by Addiction Editor
alcohol causes 7 types of cancer

Alcohol is linked to 7 types of cancer

There is strong evidence that alcohol causes seven types of cancer and probably others, according to a review that dismissed the claimed health benefits as “irrelevant”.

A study of existing research found strong evidence of a direct, harmful effect of drinking, even though scientists are unsure of the exact biological reasons why alcohol causes cancer.

Writing in the journal Addiction, Jennie Connor, from the University of Otago in New Zealand, said alcohol was estimated to have caused about half a million deaths from cancer in 2012 alone – 5.8 percent of cancer deaths worldwide.

The highest risks are from heavy drinking, but even people who drink at low levels are at risk.

Her review linked alcohol to cancer of the mouth and throat, larynx, oesophagus, liver, colon, bowel and breast.

She said: “There is strong evidence that alcohol causes cancer at seven sites, and probably others.

“Confirmation of specific biological mechanisms by which alcohol increases the incidence of each type of cancer is not required to infer that alcohol is a cause.”

She said that based on current evidence, there is no safe level of drinking with respect to cancer though the risks are reduced for some cancers when people stop drinking.

She added that the supposed health benefits of drinking – such as red wine being good for the heart – were “seen increasingly as disingenuous or irrelevant in comparison to the increase in risk of a range of cancers”.

Last month, researchers in Italy published a study showing that drinking moderate amounts of beer daily could reduce the risk of heart disease by up to 25 per cent.

In January, the UK’s chief medical officers said no level of regular drinking was without risks to health.

Publishing a raft of recommendations, they said men should consume no more than 14 units of alcohol per week, down from the previous 21 units, bringing them into line with the recommendation for women.

Modelling for the study showed that, compared with non-drinkers, women who regularly drink two units a day have a 16% increased risk of developing breast cancer and dying from it.

Those who regularly consume five units a day have a 40% increased risk. To read more click here.

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